Going down to the Mall

Today we visited a mall in another city for the first time primarily to have some lunch but took the chance to take a few photos

Not quite as historic as the ones taken by Leanne Cole on her walk in Melbourne but I liked them nonetheless

Both taken with the OLYMPUS OM-D with the 12-50mm F3.5-6.3 lens

Time to get the macro tubes out

I recently acquired an Olympus OM-D as an upgrade on the Panasonic G3. There was a good opportunity to get a near new copy for a very good price complete with a 12-50mm Oly lens that was too good to miss.

One good thing was that all my lenses including my Tamron lenses continue to be useful


OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.E-M5 using a Tamron 27A 28-80mm

Once the wasp was spotted then it was a time to grab the macro tubes. The following were shot hand held using a Tamron 27A 28-80mm plus a set of macro tubes which gets a bit interesting once you start to get thin depth of fields



This chrysanthemum flower centre was about 10mm across.


Flies never seem like much of a subject but once you start looking closely there are some interesting design elements involved. Who would have thought they were so hairy for a start or that they have hooked edges on the fronts of their wings.

 

At work on Monday we needed to go out to the National Fire Training Centre and here is a uniform line-up in the truck garage ready for the next exercise for the trainees.


LUMIX G 20/F1.7 OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.E-M5

 

Not much of a flower arrangement but an interesting set of colours and contrasts at the police station construction site


LUMIX G 20/F1.7 OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.E-M5

 

Rain clouds pass over as a southerly front moves up the country bringing snow to Dunedin and other southern areas as well as closing higher level roads,


LUMIX G 20/F1.7

OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.E-M5

Birds in the garden

These were taken using my Tamron 23A 60-300 Adaptall II lens on my Panasonic G3


This is a crop of the shot down to about half of the original frame. There are times that despite the 300mm focal length translating to 600mm, it still doesn’t seem like enough magnification as far as filling the frame. I would certainly be curious to know how much better I could get these shots with a native Panasonic 100-300mm lens.

This is pretty much as shot without cropping. Well the flower wasn’t running away was it. Not a flower we necessarily see often, we more often see the end result of it being a tomato.

It was shot with the lens on the 60mm macro function.

The  Silvereye or Wax-eye (Zosterops lateralis) was enjoying the late harvest apples. The wasps were not around at the time they were having their breakfast. Would love to be getting shots as sharp as the one on Wikipedia for the Wax-eye seen via the link above.

 


This is the only shot at a sensible ISO being 200, all others were at ISO1600. Arguably it could have been lower but to get a reasonable shutter speed and deal with no IS in lens or body.  It feels like I am getting pushed up the ISO range whether I want to or not.

This is a full-frame shot taken with a Tamron Model 05A 5X Tele-Zoom 70~350mmF/4.5 from the early 80’s with a SP 2X Tele-Converter added into the mix for an effective focal length of 1400mm. Not necessarily helpful though with losing 2 stops on the exposure with adding on the Tele-Converter.

Thanks to the people who have started following this slightly erratic blog. I hope you enjoy these too.

A catch up post…

I have managed to get out of sorts with posting images as I capture ones that I like but here goes:

 

Back in March we had to head to Taupo for a meeting at a local sports venue where I quite liked the tension caused by what appears to be a missing light.

 

And there was early morning shadows on the marque being erected for a conference event

 

 

 

On the Ides of March we took a trip over to Raglan

And you would hardly think these guys were sitting in a boat!

 

This butterflywas hanging around for a wedding that was about to occur.

 

Natural graffiti

 

This shag had been swimming around in the harbour and has just marched out onto the shore to hang it’s wings out to dry.

The joys of wriggling your toes in sun warmed West coast black sand.

 

 

ANd my wife didn’t believe me that I was seeing a blue budgie on the way to work hanging round with a group of sparrows.

 

As mentioned  in my last post a repaint of a DoC hut was done recently.

 

 

My first play with some new MFT sized macro tubes for my G3

A trip to the bush…

There came a chance for a helicopter flight in to the bush after helping to paint one of the Dept of Conservation huts (Okui) along with some other members of the Rotorua Branch of the New Zealand Deerstalkers Association. I will try to post some pictures from that trip later.

This trip to the Mangakahika Hut in the Whirinaki Forest Park was the first where I was attempting to hunt as well as be ready to take photos. Trying to do both tasks was a bit of a challenge.

If you are sensitive then please be warned that there are bones shown in some of the pictures below.

Fantail

A selection of fungi

New Zealand North Island Tomtit

Some more info on TomTits can be found here

Celery Pine leaves

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllocladus_trichomanoides

And there was steeper country to navigate…

There was a 1080 poison drop in this area in 2012 and there was a degree of by-kill a.k.a. collateral damage.

See this blog post from a Minginui local on their thoughts on 1080. The opinions are wide and varied on 1080.

I managed to find these couple of skeletons in a complete state with no apparent cause of death. I didn’t check all of the bones for damage but by all accounts there was no damage from gunshots.

The different colours are primarily related to the difference in dampness between the two areas.

Rakaia

A poodle – Weimaranner cross hunting dogs with a very soft nature.

New Zealand Grey Warbler

A fungal condominium